Estate Planning Archives - Weaver, Bennett & Bland, PA

What Is a High Asset Divorce?

While divorces involving relatively few assets can be uncomplicated, those that involve a business, rental homes, stock options, pensions, or other assets can present challenges—even when the parties generally agree on the division of assets. And when the division of assets is contested, the legal issues facing you can be even tougher. What should you

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Estate Plan Guidelines: What Assets Pass Through My Will?

When drafting a last will and testament, many people want to start the consultation for their estate plan with numbers. They may want to leave $20,000 to each of their children, $1,000 to their favorite niece, and $500 to their local charity. These numbers are usually developed after consideration of all their assets, such as

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I Just Had A Baby. Do I Need A Will?

If you just had a baby, you should speak to an estate planning attorney. There are legal tools an they can use to help you plan for your child’s physical well being and financial security, and these tools can address situations both during your life and upon your passing. How an estate planning attorney can

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Learn How to Execute a Will in North Carolina

Making a Last Will and Testament is the cornerstone of estate planning—it’s one of the most important legal decisions you can make in your lifetime. Without a will, North Carolina law will determine how your property and assets are distributed after your passing.  But by drafting a will, you’re in control of the division of

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What is a Trust and What Does it Do?

A trust is a fiduciary arrangement that allows a trustee (a third party, not usually the beneficiary), to hold assets on behalf of a beneficiary or beneficiaries. Trusts can be drafted to deal with many situations and issues (e.g., minority, disability, spendthrift, creditor issues of a beneficiary, etc.) and can specify exactly how and when

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Two Types of Powers of Attorneys You Should Have

If you are incapacitated or incompetent as determined by a physician and cannot make your own health care decisions, who can make these decisions on your behalf (e.g., authorize medical procedures, hire/fire health care providers, get/release your medical information, place you in a health care facility, long-term facility, etc.)? Even if you’re currently healthy, it’s

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What is a Living Will and why do I need one?

Estate planning involves more than determining who will get your assets on your death. Undesired medical treatment can negatively impact your estate plan and possibly deplete your assets. Establishing documents detailing your wishes regarding medical treatment are important for your estate plan and for you and your family’s well-being—this is often done with a “living

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